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  • Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of the Obese

    Posted: 04/26/2017

    Exercise Benefits Aging Hearts, Even Those of the Obese MONDAY, April 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise can reduce the risk of heart damage in middle-aged adults and seniors -- even in those who are obese, according to a new study. "The protective association of physical activity against [heart] damage may have implications for heart failure risk reduction, particularly among the high-risk group of individuals with excess weight," study lead author Dr. Roberta Florido said in an American College of ...

  • Early Treatment Equals Better Results for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Posted: 04/26/2017

    Early Treatment Equals Better Results for Rheumatoid Arthritis TUESDAY, April 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Treating rheumatoid arthritis early may make for better outcomes, a new study suggests. Patients who were treated within six months of developing the first signs of the autoimmune disease did better in the long run and were less likely to suffer early death, British researchers found. The findings stem from an analysis of more than 600 patients who were initially diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis...

  • Exercise Guidelines: How Much Is Enough?

    Posted: 04/26/2017

    Exercise Guidelines: How Much Is Enough? WEDNESDAY, April 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to exercise, even a modest investment can pay off big time in terms of your health. The latest U.S. government guidelines say that most adults need at least two-and-a-half hours of moderate-intensity exercise each week to control weight and prevent some illnesses, including heart disease, diabetes and some types of cancer. That's just a half-hour of exercise on most days of the week. And, hitting the gym...

  • Early School Start Times Tough on Teens

    Posted: 04/25/2017

    Early School Start Times Tough on Teens TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Any parent who's ever had to drag a groggy teen out of bed in the morning would likely agree with new guidelines that say kids should start school later in the morning. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (ASSM) now recommends that middle and high schools should start classes no earlier than 8:30 a.m., so that teens get enough sleep during the week. Delaying the school day would help reduce tardiness, improve attendan...

  • Epilepsy: Another Potential Zika Threat to Babies

    Posted: 04/24/2017

    Epilepsy: Another Potential Zika Threat to Babies MONDAY, April 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Beyond its known links to birth defects and other problems, the Zika virus may also trigger cases of epilepsy in infants, warn experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among 48 babies from Brazil with probable congenital Zika infection, "50 percent reportedly had clinical seizures," said Dr. Daniel Pastula, Dr. Marshalyn Yeargin-Allsopp and Rosemarie Kobau. All three have studied Zika at...

  • Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Higher Heart Risks

    Posted: 04/21/2017

    Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Higher Heart Risks THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hot flashes may be more than a troublesome nuisance for some women during menopause -- they may be a signal for increased risk of heart disease, new research suggests. Researchers tracked the health of 272 nonsmoking women, aged 40 to 60. Among women between 40 and 53 years of age, frequent hot flashes were linked to poorer function in blood vessels, the study found. This association was independent of oth...

  • Exercisers May Have Better Shot of Surviving Heart Attack

    Posted: 04/19/2017

    Exercisers May Have Better Shot of Surviving Heart Attack WEDNESDAY, April 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Maybe this will be the news that finally jolts you off the couch and into an exercise program. A new study suggests that being physically active increases the chances of survival after a heart attack. Researchers compared exercise levels among 1,664 heart attack patients in Denmark, including 425 who died immediately. Those who had been physically active were less likely to die, and the risk of death ...

  • EpiPen Out-of-Pocket Costs More Than Doubled Over Decade

    Posted: 04/11/2017

    EpiPen Out-of-Pocket Costs More Than Doubled Over Decade TUESDAY, April 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Annual out-of-pocket costs for lifesaving EpiPens in the United States skyrocketed nearly 124 percent for many privately insured patients between 2007 and 2014, a new study finds. An EpiPen is the most widely used epinephrine auto-injector. The pocket-sized device is needed when someone is having a life-threatening allergic reaction. "The major concern is that these increases may lead patients to forgo fi...

  • Elite Runners, Women the First Marathoners to Lose to Father Time

    Posted: 04/07/2017

    Elite Runners, Women the First Marathoners to Lose to Father Time THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- All marathon runners eventually slow down. But a new study finds that whether a runner is average or elite, or whether they are a man or a woman, may determine at what age and how much their pace will decline. The researchers reviewed 2001-2016 data from three of the largest U.S. marathons -- Boston, Chicago and New York City. "We found that marathon performance decline begins at about 35 years...

  • Exercising 2.5 Hours a Week May Slow Parkinson's Progression

    Posted: 04/06/2017

    Exercising 2.5 Hours a Week May Slow Parkinson's Progression WEDNESDAY, March 29, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Parkinson's disease can cause tremors, stiffness and trouble with walking. But a new study suggests that regular exercise can slow the progression of the disease. Even those with advanced Parkinson's can benefit from activity, the study authors said. The research included more than 3,400 patients in North America, the Netherlands and Israel who were followed for more than two years. During that tim...