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  • FDA Proposes Ban on 'Shock' Device Used to Curb Self-Harm

    Posted: 04/29/2016

    FDA Proposes Ban on 'Shock' Device Used to Curb Self-Harm FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Electrical stimulation devices, used to treat self-harming or aggressive behaviors, should be banned, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Friday. The devices pose substantial risks that cannot be eliminated through labeling changes, according to the agency. These electrical stimulation devices deliver shocks through electrodes attached to the skin in an attempt to condition people to stop hurting ...

  • Fewer Children May Explain Why More Women Now Outlive Men

    Posted: 04/29/2016

    Fewer Children May Explain Why More Women Now Outlive Men MONDAY, April 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Smaller families may be one reason why women now outlive men, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed data from 140,600 people in Utah and found that men who were born in the early to mid-1800s lived an average of two years longer than women born at the same time. This difference gradually reversed, and women born in the early 1900s lived an average of four years longer than men, the findings showed. ...

  • Female Pelvis Widens, Then Shrinks Over a Lifetime, Study Finds

    Posted: 04/29/2016

    Female Pelvis Widens, Then Shrinks Over a Lifetime, Study Finds MONDAY, April 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A woman's pelvic structure keeps adapting over her lifetime -- first widening to accommodate childbirth, then later narrowing, a new study suggests. The researchers said their findings challenge the idea that a woman's pelvis is set in stone. Some scientists have proposed that the female pelvis was "programmed by evolution for childbirth," explained lead researcher Marcia Ponce de Leon. At the same...

  • Focus on Healthy Foods, Not Avoiding 'Bad' Ones, for Heart Health: Study

    Posted: 04/29/2016

    Focus on Healthy Foods, Not Avoiding 'Bad' Ones, for Heart Health: Study MONDAY, April 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Emphasizing healthy foods in your diet, not just banishing "bad" foods, may be the key to avoiding heart attack and stroke, a new study suggests. Researchers analyzed the eating habits of thousands of older adults worldwide with heart disease and found results that might surprise you. "Eating a healthy diet seems to have protective effects, but unhealthy foods don't seem to cause any harm,...

  • First Zika Death Reported in Puerto Rico

    Posted: 04/29/2016

    First Zika Death Reported in Puerto Rico FRIDAY, April 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first known Zika virus-linked death in Puerto Rico was announced Friday by officials of the U.S. territory. A 70-year-old man with Zika died in February from severe thrombocytopenia, which causes a low blood platelet count that can lead to internal bleeding. The death was announced by Puerto Rico's health secretary, Ana Ruis. So far, Puerto Rico has had more than 600 Zika cases, including 73 involving pregnant women....

  • FDA Launches Ad Campaign Against Chewing Tobacco

    Posted: 04/27/2016

    FDA Launches Ad Campaign Against Chewing Tobacco TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials said Tuesday that they are targeting rural teenagers with a new $36 million ad campaign that highlights the health risks associated with chewing tobacco. The campaign's message -- "smokeless doesn't mean harmless" -- will challenge a habit that has become a tradition in the rural United States, said Mitch Zeller, director of the Center for Tobacco Products at the U.S. Food and Drug Administ...

  • Fighting Back, Bedbugs Grow a Thicker Skin

    Posted: 04/20/2016

    Fighting Back, Bedbugs Grow a Thicker Skin WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bedbugs may be developing thicker "skins" that help them resist common pesticides, a new study suggests. This might explain why bedbug populations are increasing worldwide, the researchers added. "If we understand the biological mechanisms bedbugs use to beat insecticides, we may be able to spot a chink in their armor that we can exploit with new strategies," study author David Lilly, from the University of Sydney i...

  • Freezing Technique May Ease 'Phantom Limb' Pain for Amputees

    Posted: 04/18/2016

    Freezing Technique May Ease 'Phantom Limb' Pain for Amputees FRIDAY, April 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A freezing technique may reduce the debilitating phantom limb pain that many amputees experience, according to a new, small study. Chronic pain that emanates from the site of a severed limb can be reduced in some cases when the remaining nerve and scar tissue is frozen in place, researchers said. The minimally invasive technique, known as cryoablation therapy, may offer hope to the roughly 200,000 Amer...

  • First Wire-Free Pacemaker Approved

    Posted: 04/17/2016

    First Wire-Free Pacemaker Approved FRIDAY, April 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first pacemaker to treat irregular heartbeat without the need for wires between the device and the heart has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Micra Transcatheter Pacing System is implanted in the heart's right ventricle, the FDA said in a news release. In traditional pacemakers, wired leads may malfunction and require the device to be replaced. The device was evaluated in clinical studies involvin...

  • FDA Approves First Wire-Free Pacemaker

    Posted: 04/15/2016

    FDA Approves First Wire-Free Pacemaker THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The first leadless, wire-free heart pacemaker has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Medtronic's Micra Transcatheter Pacing System works like other pacemakers to regulate heart rate in people with heart rhythm disorders, but does not use wired leads to make the electrical connection between the device and the heart. One expert believes the device's approval is a big win for heart patients. "The leadle...