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  • Nearly 4 Million Worldwide Die Each Year From Asthma, COPD

    Posted: 08/20/2017

    Nearly 4 Million Worldwide Die Each Year From Asthma, COPD WEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Two major chronic lung diseases -- asthma and COPD -- kill nearly 4 million people worldwide annually, a new report finds. The study calculates that 3.2 million people died in 2015 from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) -- a group of lung conditions that includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis, often tied to smoking. Asthma caused another 400,000 deaths, the report found. While asthma is ...

  • Nurses Learn How to Get Patients to Say 'Yes' to Blood Thinners

    Posted: 08/20/2017

    Nurses Learn How to Get Patients to Say 'Yes' to Blood Thinners THURSDAY, Aug. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Online training for nurses increased hospital patients' use of medication that can prevent potentially deadly blood clots, a new study reveals. Nurses sometimes won't give the blood thinning drugs if patients don't want them. So researchers developed the training to teach nurses how to respond when patients say they don't want to take blood thinners. The study included more than 900 nurses at John...

  • Novel Procedure Improves Kidney Transplant Success

    Posted: 08/15/2017

    Novel Procedure Improves Kidney Transplant Success WEDNESDAY, Aug. 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new treatment might open the door for more patients with advanced kidney disease to get a transplant, a preliminary study suggests. Of the 100,000-plus Americans waiting for a donor kidney, about one-third are "sensitized," said Dr. Robert Montgomery, director of the Transplant Institute at NYU Langone in New York City. Those patients face a tough situation: They harbor immune system antibodies that are prim...

  • Need to Calm Down? Try Talking to Yourself

    Posted: 08/13/2017

    Need to Calm Down? Try Talking to Yourself TUESDAY, Aug. 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Talking to yourself in the third person can help control your emotions when you're upset, new research suggests. The findings are based on experiments in which volunteers underwent brain scans while confronted with upsetting situations. For example, a man named Fred is upset about a recent romantic breakup. By reflecting on his feelings in the third person ("Why is Fred upset?"), he is better able to keep his emotions i...

  • Netflix Series '13 Reasons Why' Sparks Uptick in Google Searches for Suicide

    Posted: 08/10/2017

    Netflix Series '13 Reasons Why' Sparks Uptick in Google Searches for Suicide MONDAY, July 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- After the release of the controversial Netflix series "13 Reasons Why" -- a show that depicts the suicide of a fictional teenager -- there were surges in the number of Google searches using the term "suicide," a new analysis reveals. Specifically, searches that included the word "suicide" jumped 19 percent over a 19-day period after the series was first released. That amounts to between...

  • Noninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of Dementia

    Posted: 08/07/2017

    Noninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of Dementia WEDNESDAY, July 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from another common form of dementia may get easier using a new, noninvasive technique, researchers say. While Alzheimer's is the best-known form of dementia, another form of brain deterioration, called frontotemporal dementia (FTD), accounts for 10 percent to 15 percent of dementia cases. However, the researchers noted that FTD is often initially misdiagnosed as a psychia...

  • Nearly All Autopsied NFL Players Show Trauma-Linked Brain Disease

    Posted: 08/06/2017

    Nearly All Autopsied NFL Players Show Trauma-Linked Brain Disease TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Ninety-nine percent of former NFL players who donated their brain to science turned out to have the devastating disorder chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), according to a new report. Researchers found evidence of the degenerative brain disease in 110 out of 111 deceased National Football League players, said study co-author Dr. Daniel Daneshvar. He is a researcher with the Boston University ...

  • Noise Pollution a Problem in Black Urban Neighborhoods

    Posted: 08/06/2017

    Noise Pollution a Problem in Black Urban Neighborhoods TUESDAY, July 25, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Noise pollution levels are highest in black neighborhoods in segregated cities in the United States, a new study shows. Researchers looked at 13 years of information gathered from across the United States. They found as percentages of Asian, black or Hispanic residents rose, so did noise levels during both day and night. Neighborhoods with at least 75 percent black residents had median night-time noise leve...

  • Not All Plant Foods Are Equal

    Posted: 07/27/2017

    Not All Plant Foods Are Equal MONDAY, July 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For years, the mantra has been that eating lots of fruits, vegetables and grains will ward off heart disease, but a new study suggests that choosing the wrong ones may backfire. The study, of over 200,000 U.S. health professionals, found those who ate plenty of healthy plant foods -- such as vegetables, beans and whole grains -- did have a lower risk of heart disease. That was not true, however, if people loaded up on foods that are...

  • Not All Fidos Are Friendly

    Posted: 07/26/2017

    Not All Fidos Are Friendly MONDAY, July 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Kids love dogs -- dressing them up, tugging on them, kissing them, and even riding them like a horse. But sometimes, things can end badly, a pediatricians' group says. That's probably why children account for more than half of the 800,000 Americans who receive medical care for dog bites annually. Children are much more likely than adults to suffer serious injuries when bitten by a dog, and children are most likely to suffer bites from ...