RWJ Health Connect | Patient PortalGo
  • 1-888-MD-RWJUH
  • YouTube

Health Library

Results 1 - 10 of 1135
Search Results:  W (1135)
  • When a Preemie Goes Home, Dad Stresses Out

    Posted: 12/11/2017

    When a Preemie Goes Home, Dad Stresses Out THURSDAY, Dec. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When parents bring a premature baby home from the hospital, it's the dads who feel the most stress, a new study finds. "Dad goes from a situation where the baby and mom are cared for by experts in the hospital to having to simultaneously care for his baby, partner and work. He is supposed to be the 'rock' for his partner but the stress can really set in," said study lead author Dr. Craig Garfield. He's an associate pro...

  • What to Do If Someone's Bleeding Badly

    Posted: 12/11/2017

    What to Do If Someone's Bleeding Badly FRIDAY, Dec. 8, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- By knowing how to stop bleeding, you could save the life of a seriously injured person. Analysis of mass tragedies such as the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in 2012 revealed that many victims could have been saved if bystanders had known how to control their bleeding, according to Dr. Justin Chandler, a trauma surgeon at Penn State's Hershey Medical Center. Penn State is part of a national program called "Stop the Bl...

  • Window Blinds: A Silent Killer in Your Home

    Posted: 12/11/2017

    Window Blinds: A Silent Killer in Your Home MONDAY, Dec. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Decades after the danger was first recognized, young children are still being injured or even killed by the cords in window blinds. Researchers found that between 1990 and 2015, nearly 17,000 U.S. children younger than 6 years landed in the ER for injuries related to window blinds. Most often, the injuries were not serious. However, one child died each month, on average -- usually from strangulation by window-blind cor...

  • With A-Fib, Urban Hospitals May Be a Better Bet

    Posted: 12/11/2017

    With A-Fib, Urban Hospitals May Be a Better Bet MONDAY, Dec. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The chance of dying from a common heart rhythm disorder is higher for people treated at rural rather than urban hospitals, a new study finds. The researchers analyzed data from hospitalizations for the heart ailment known as atrial fibrillation -- or a-fib -- in the United States between 2012 and 2014. A-fib can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other complications. If untreated, a-fib doubles the risk...

  • With Diabetes, Be on the Alert for Foot Sores

    Posted: 12/07/2017

    With Diabetes, Be on the Alert for Foot Sores MONDAY, Nov. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Having diabetes means keeping track of what you eat, how much you exercise, your blood sugar levels and even the condition of your feet. When it comes to diabetes-related foot health, the goal is to prevent and treat foot ulcers that can lead to gangrene and amputation, one surgeon explained. "Around 80 percent of diabetes-related lower extremity amputations start out as a foot ulcer," vascular surgeon Dr. Anil Hingo...

  • Who's Most Distracted Behind the Wheel?

    Posted: 12/06/2017

    Who's Most Distracted Behind the Wheel? FRIDAY, Nov. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Texting, talking on cellphones, eating, drinking -- distractions such as these are a driving hazard, and are more likely to occur among young men, new research shows. People most prone to distracted driving also often tend to think it's "no big deal" -- socially acceptable, the Norwegian study found. These drivers often also felt that they had little control over being distracted. On the other hand, older women, and people...

  • Women Still Want Annual Mammograms

    Posted: 12/04/2017

    Women Still Want Annual Mammograms TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Most American women would prefer to get a mammogram to screen for breast cancer every year rather than every two years, a new study finds. Currently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women at average risk for breast cancer be screened every two years, beginning at age 50. The recommendation is based in part on potential harms associated with screening mammography. Those include diagnosis and treatment of...

  • What It Takes to Get Teens Moving

    Posted: 11/30/2017

    What It Takes to Get Teens Moving SATURDAY, Nov. 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Teens with friends are active teens, a new study suggests. "You can build beautiful parks and facilities; but if children don't have friends to play with, these facilities won't be enough to increase their physical activity," said study lead author Sarah-Jeanne Salvy. "Peers and friends are the catalyst of the physical environment," Salvy added. She is an associate professor in the division of preventive medicine at the Univer...

  • When Treating Infertility, Vitamin D Levels May Be Key

    Posted: 11/30/2017

    When Treating Infertility, Vitamin D Levels May Be Key MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Women with low vitamin D levels may be less likely to have a baby after assisted reproductive technology (ART) than those with normal vitamin D levels, a new study suggests. The finding stemmed from a review of 11 published studies that involved a total of 2,700 women who were undergoing ART, which includes in vitro fertilization and frozen embryo transfer to achieve pregnancy. The British researchers found ...

  • Why a Headache Feels So Draining

    Posted: 11/27/2017

    Why a Headache Feels So Draining WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For many people, nothing's more draining than a throbbing headache or toothache. Scientists now think they know why. In experiments with mice, researchers at Duke University found that sensory neurons in the head and face are directly linked to one of the brain's main emotional signaling hubs. Sensory neurons in other parts of the body are only indirectly linked to this hub. The findings could lead to more effective treatments...