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  • Wider Low-Dose Aspirin Use Would Save U.S. $692 Billion: Study

    Posted: 12/06/2016

    Wider Low-Dose Aspirin Use Would Save U.S. $692 Billion: Study WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Taking low-dose aspirin daily can reduce older Americans' risk of heart disease and cancer, and lead to significant savings in health care spending, a new study contends. University of Southern California researchers used national data to assess the long-term benefits of daily aspirin usage. They calculated that taking low-dose aspirin every day would prevent 11 cases of heart disease and four cas...

  • Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise

    Posted: 12/06/2016

    Web-Based Help for Insomnia Shows Promise WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People find help for all sorts of maladies online. Now, insomnia might be one of them. A web-based interactive program may help chronically sleepless individuals get needed shuteye without taking medication or spending time on a therapist's couch, a new study suggests. The six-week program uses cognitive behavior therapy techniques -- a standard treatment for insomnia -- to help reset sleep patterns, the researchers s...

  • Worldwide Cancer Rates Up More Than One-Third in Past Decade: Report

    Posted: 12/06/2016

    Worldwide Cancer Rates Up More Than One-Third in Past Decade: Report SATURDAY, Dec. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer cases rose 33 percent worldwide in the past 10 years, a new study shows. In 2015, there were 17.5 million diagnoses and 8.7 million deaths in the world from the disease, the researchers found. The rise in cancer cases was mainly due to population aging and growth, along with changes in age-specific cancer rates, according to the Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration study. The l...

  • When Sibling Has Epilepsy, Kids Worry

    Posted: 12/06/2016

    When Sibling Has Epilepsy, Kids Worry MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Brothers and sisters of children with epilepsy tend to worry and feel protective toward them, a new study finds. "When a child has a chronic disease, it impacts the family and we wanted to learn how it affects siblings of children with epilepsy," said lead researcher Barbara Kroner. She's a senior epidemiologist at RTI International, a nonprofit research institute headquartered in North Carolina. "We found very few disapprovi...

  • Winter Shoes Can Boost Bunion Pain

    Posted: 12/05/2016

    Winter Shoes Can Boost Bunion Pain FRIDAY, Nov. 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- As temperatures tumble and women switch from sandals to closed-toe shoes, bunions can be a real pain, experts say. Bunions are bony bumps on the joint at the base of the big toe. Their cause is unclear but they develop over time. And shoes with narrow foot boxes can rub against them, causing inflammation and pain, according to members of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons (ACFAS). To prevent these problems, women s...

  • Women at Greater Risk Than Men for Zika Infection: Study

    Posted: 11/24/2016

    Women at Greater Risk Than Men for Zika Infection: Study WEDNESDAY, Nov. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Women are at greater risk for Zika infection than men, new research in mice suggests. Scientists found the virus appears to trigger a delay in the vagina's immune response. This delay allows the virus to go undetected, putting a fetus at greater risk for infection as well, the Gladstone Institute scientists explained. "Our research supports epidemiological studies showing that women are at a greater ris...

  • Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Heart Risks

    Posted: 11/22/2016

    Weight-Loss Surgery Tied to Lower Heart Risks MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Weight-loss surgery may significantly reduce obese people's risk of heart failure, a new study indicates. Researchers compared more than 25,800 obese people who had weight-loss (bariatric) surgery with more than 13,700 obese people who tried to lose weight through a program of major lifestyle changes. Both groups had no history of heart failure. Four years after the start of treatment, the weight-loss surgery group h...

  • West Nile's Long-Term Death Toll May Be Higher Than Thought

    Posted: 11/21/2016

    West Nile's Long-Term Death Toll May Be Higher Than Thought MONDAY, Nov. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new study suggests that the death toll from the mosquito-borne West Nile virus might be much greater than thought because its effects may often kill people months or years after infection. "We are hoping our research findings will help encourage a push to develop a vaccine that can help prevent disease and premature death," said study co-author Dr. Kristy Murray, an associate professor with National S...

  • Weight-Loss Surgery Brings Bigger Heart Benefits to Women: Study

    Posted: 11/14/2016

    Weight-Loss Surgery Brings Bigger Heart Benefits to Women: Study FRIDAY, Nov. 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- After weight-loss surgery, women may have a lower risk of heart disease than men, a new study suggests. The study included nearly 2,000 patients whose risk for heart disease was assessed in the decade before their surgery and one year after the procedure. All patients had a significant reduction in their heart disease risk after weight-loss (bariatric) surgery. But, women had a 41 percent reduced ri...

  • Water: Can It Be Too Much of a Good Thing?

    Posted: 11/13/2016

    Water: Can It Be Too Much of a Good Thing? THURSDAY, Nov. 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Dehydration is a familiar foe for endurance athletes, and one that will be on the minds of every participant in Sunday's New York City Marathon. But did you know that drinking too much water can be potentially fatal, particularly if not treated properly? And you don't have to be an elite athlete like a marathoner to fall victim to what doctors call water intoxication. Water intoxication occurs when a person has consume...