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  • Zika Can Harm Babies' Vision, Too

    Posted: 04/25/2017

    Zika Can Harm Babies' Vision, Too TUESDAY, April 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although Zika virus is most well-known for the devastating neurological damage it can cause in the womb, a new study reports that some babies infected with Zika also may have lifelong vision impairment. Forty-three babies born in Colombia and Venezuela suffered damage to both eyes after being exposed to Zika through their pregnant mothers, researchers said. Their mothers showed no signs of eye problems. The damage mainly invol...

  • Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers

    Posted: 04/04/2017

    Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers TUESDAY, March 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zejula (niraparib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adult women with recurring cancers of the ovaries, fallopian tubes or abdominal wall (peritoneum) whose tumors have shrunk in response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Citing the National Cancer Institute, the FDA said in a news release that more than 22,000 women are expected to be diagnosed with these cancers this year, and more th...

  • Zika Virus May Also Harm the Heart

    Posted: 03/19/2017

    Zika Virus May Also Harm the Heart THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika may cause heart problems in some people infected with the mosquito-borne virus, researchers report. A new study has identified nine Venezuelan patients who suffered from heart problems shortly after coming down with Zika virus symptoms. Eight of the nine patients developed dangerous heart rhythm disorders, and two-thirds had evidence of heart failure, a condition in which the heart isn't pumping enough blood to meet the ...

  • Zika Attacks Nerves, Muscles, Other Tissues

    Posted: 03/19/2017

    Zika Attacks Nerves, Muscles, Other Tissues THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists have learned where the Zika virus attacks the body in monkeys. In their study, researchers saw that the virus invades tissues in the nervous system, reproductive and urinary tracts, lymph nodes, muscles and joints. Zika then persists in these tissues for at least 35 days, the researchers reported. "This study helps us better understand how the virus manifests itself so that scientists can develop therapies...

  • Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice

    Posted: 03/01/2017

    Zika Infection Shrinks Testicles in Mice WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika virus can be sexually transmitted through semen, and a new mouse study could help explain why that occurs -- and how the virus might damage male fertility. In lab research, Zika attacked the testicles of mice, targeting cells that produce the male hormone testosterone and ultimately causing testes to shrink, the researchers said. These findings "explain the persistence of the virus in semen," said Dr. Amesh Adalja...

  • Zika Lingers in Semen for Less Time Than Thought: Study

    Posted: 02/22/2017

    Zika Lingers in Semen for Less Time Than Thought: Study TUESDAY, Feb. 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests the Zika virus lingers in a man's semen no longer than three months in almost all cases. Still, guidelines from the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention recommend that infected men use condoms or abstain from sex for six months after infection with the Zika virus. Infectious disease experts said those guidelines should stay that way. "Better to err on the long end," said Mat...

  • Zika Fears, Opioid Abuse Crisis Top Health News for 2016

    Posted: 01/08/2017

    Zika Fears, Opioid Abuse Crisis Top Health News for 2016 THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When news reports first began to emerge of mysterious, severe birth defects in Brazilian newborns, few could have imagined these isolated tragedies would explode into the leading health news story of 2016: the Zika virus. Soon, those few Brazilian cases of microcephaly -- babies born with abnormally small heads and underdeveloped brains -- grew to become thousands. Doctors quickly made the link between m...

  • Zika Still a Threat During Winter Months

    Posted: 12/20/2016

    Zika Still a Threat During Winter Months TUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Winter doesn't necessarily mean the end of the Zika threat in the United States, a public health expert says. Zika is transmitted by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Their eggs can survive in conditions that kill adult mosquitoes, explained Dr. James Diaz. He is program director of Environmental/Occupational Health Sciences at Louisiana State University's School of Public Health in New Orleans. "Not only can the eggs of Aedes s...

  • Zika-Linked Birth Defects Surge in Colombia: CDC

    Posted: 12/18/2016

    Zika-Linked Birth Defects Surge in Colombia: CDC FRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The tragedy of hundreds of babies born with devastating birth defects linked to the Zika virus is no longer confined to Brazil, a new report confirms. Colombia is now also experiencing a surge in these cases of infant microcephaly. It's a birth defect where newborns whose mothers contracted the mosquito-borne virus in pregnancy are born with too-small skulls and underdeveloped brains. A team led by Margaret Honein,...

  • Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC

    Posted: 11/30/2016

    Zika Babies May Look Normal at Birth, Display Brain Defects Later: CDC TUESDAY, Nov. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Babies exposed to the Zika virus in the womb can look normal at birth but later show signs of the devastating birth defect microcephaly and other brain abnormalities, researchers reported Tuesday. Scientists found that 13 infants in Brazil who were exposed to the mosquito-borne virus during gestation had normal head size as newborns, but subsequently experienced slower head growth. Eleven of...