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  • Anti-Addiction Meds Given in ER Can Help Battle Abuse

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    Anti-Addiction Meds Given in ER Can Help Battle Abuse FRIDAY, Feb. 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People addicted to opioids treated in a hospital emergency department do better when they receive medication to reduce opioid cravings, researchers report. "The ED [emergency department] visit is an ideal opportunity to identify patients with opioid use disorder and initiate treatment and direct referral, similar to best practices for other diseases, such as high blood pressure and diabetes," said study co-le...

  • After Wives Suffer Stroke, Husbands Adapt to Caregiving Role

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    After Wives Suffer Stroke, Husbands Adapt to Caregiving Role TUESDAY, Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Being thrust into the role of caring for a spouse or partner who's had a stroke can be terribly unsettling. But in a small study, men reported more successes than problems in their first year of caregiving. A majority of men in the study (54 percent) worked full-time while caring for their spouse and assuming household tasks, such as cooking, cleaning and paying the bills. They spent two to 16 hours a...

  • After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    After Stroke, 'Blue' Light May Help Beat the Blues WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression is always a danger for people recovering from a debilitating stroke. But new research suggests that tweaking a rehabilitation facility's lighting system may help patients keep depression at bay. Specifically, the Danish study of stroke rehab patients found they were less prone to depression if the facility used "blue" light in its lighting system. Sunlight is humans' largest source of blue-spectrum...

  • ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls WEDNESDAY, Feb. 22, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- As kids play sports like soccer and football with more frequency and force, many are damaging their knees, a new study finds. A common knee injury -- an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear -- has steadily increased among 6- to 18-year-olds in the United States, rising more than 2 percent a year over the last two decades, researchers report. These injuries peak in high school, said lead researcher Dr. Nichol...

  • As Trump Rolls Back Transgender Bathroom Rights . . .

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    As Trump Rolls Back Transgender Bathroom Rights . . . THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The controversy over so-called transgender bathroom bills continues to escalate following President Donald Trump's decision Wednesday to overturn an Obama administration directive that allowed students to use restrooms that correspond with their gender identity. Conservatives who saw the Obama directive as a glaring example of federal government overreach were delighted with Wednesday's announcement. "No lo...

  • A Stressed Life May Mean a Wider Waistline

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    A Stressed Life May Mean a Wider Waistline THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Days filled with stress and anxiety may be upping your risk of becoming overweight or obese, British researchers say. The researchers said they found a link between high levels of the stress hormone cortisol and excess weight. "We don't know which came first, the greater body weight or the higher cortisol," said researcher Andrew Steptoe. He's the British Heart Foundation professor of psychology at University College ...

  • America in 2017: Pass the Prozac, Please

    Posted: 02/23/2017

    America in 2017: Pass the Prozac, Please WEDNESDAY, Feb. 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans are stressed about the future of the country, and politics and terrorism are key reasons why, a new survey finds. "The stress we're seeing around political issues is deeply concerning, because it's hard for Americans to get away from it," said Katherine Nordal. She's executive director for professional practice at the American Psychological Association, which conducted the poll. "We're surrounded by conv...

  • Amphetamine Abuse Abuses the Heart

    Posted: 02/20/2017

    Amphetamine Abuse Abuses the Heart FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Using illegal amphetamine drugs such as "speed" and "ice" may lead to premature aging of the arteries and heart, researchers warn. They said their new study adds to evidence about the need to tackle the "global stimulant epidemic." The investigators were led by Stuart Reece, a clinical associate professor at the University of Western Australia. They assessed arterial stiffening in more than 700 Australians in their 30s and 40s....

  • Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    Posted: 02/20/2017

    Air Pollution May Raise Risk of Type 2 Diabetes FRIDAY, Feb. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of air pollution may increase some Hispanic children's risk of type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. "Exposure to heightened air pollution during childhood increases the risk for Hispanic children to become obese and, independent of that, to also develop type 2 diabetes," said study corresponding author Michael Goran. He is co-director of the University of Southern California's Diabetes and Obesity Res...

  • A Plug Instead of a Snip for Male Birth Control?

    Posted: 02/15/2017

    A Plug Instead of a Snip for Male Birth Control? TUESDAY, Feb. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new gel-based vasectomy has proven effective in a group of monkeys, raising hopes it could one day provide a permanent but easily reversible male contraceptive option in humans. Vasalgel works by plugging the vas deferens, the two tiny tubes that convey sperm into a male's semen, researchers said. The gel "doesn't break down. It just sets up a little more, and sticks where you inject it," said lead researcher Ca...