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  • Businesses Should Be Mindful of Zika Danger to Workers, CDC Says

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Businesses Should Be Mindful of Zika Danger to Workers, CDC Says FRIDAY, April 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Summer, mosquito season and the threat of Zika virus transmission is approaching, and federal health experts on Friday issued guidelines to help protect American workers from infection. Infection during pregnancy with the mosquito-borne virus is known to cause a devastating birth defect known as microcephaly (abnormally small heads) in babies. It's also thought that a man can transmit the Zika vir...

  • Babies Fed Rice-Based Cereals Have Higher Arsenic Levels, Study Finds

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Babies Fed Rice-Based Cereals Have Higher Arsenic Levels, Study Finds MONDAY, April 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Parents commonly give rice to their babies as a first food. Now, researchers say infants fed rice-based foods may have significantly higher "inorganic" arsenic concentrations in their urine than babies who never eat rice. The highest arsenic concentrations were found in infants who frequently ate baby rice cereal, with levels more than three times that of babies who didn't eat rice, the study...

  • Bed Bugs Drawn to Red and Black Colors

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Bed Bugs Drawn to Red and Black Colors MONDAY, April 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Bed bugs have favorite colors, new research has discovered. In a series of experiments, researchers noted that the little blood suckers strongly preferred red and black and avoided green and yellow. Does that mean it's time to redecorate your bedroom in colors these pests don't like? It's probably too soon for that, study co-author Corraine McNeill, from Union College in Lincoln, Nebraska, said in a news release from the E...

  • Births of Triplets, Quadruplets on Decline in U.S.: Report

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Births of Triplets, Quadruplets on Decline in U.S.: Report THURSDAY, April 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1998, births of three or more babies at once have fallen by more than 40 percent in the United States, new government statistics reveal. Moreover, declines of 50 percent or more were seen in certain states, and among women aged 25 and older, according to the report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). The falloff appears to be c...

  • Building Muscle Could Boost the Body's Most Important Muscle

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Building Muscle Could Boost the Body's Most Important Muscle THURSDAY, April 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having more muscle and less fat reduces the risk of early death in people with heart disease, a new study suggests. Doctors should encourage patients to do resistance exercises as part of a healthy lifestyle, rather than emphasizing and monitoring weight loss, the study authors advised. For the study, Dr. Preethi Srikanthan of the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues analyzed data g...

  • Bullying Can Turn Victims Into Bullies

    Posted: 04/30/2016

    Bullying Can Turn Victims Into Bullies SATURDAY, April 30, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A combination of face-to-face taunting and cyberbullying may greatly increase the risk that victims will become bullies themselves, a new study suggests. "Students who are victimized are more likely to exhibit aggressive behaviors towards others," said study principal investigator Alexandra Hua, from Cohen Children's Medical Center of New York. "This phenomenon may lead to a vicious cycle whereby bullies create bullies o...

  • Breast Cancer Meds Won't Raise Chances of Heart Attack, Stroke, Study Suggests

    Posted: 04/28/2016

    Breast Cancer Meds Won't Raise Chances of Heart Attack, Stroke, Study Suggests THURSDAY, April 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment with estrogen-lowering drugs called aromatase inhibitors doesn't raise the risk of heart attacks and strokes among breast cancer survivors, a new study suggests. However, the researchers did find that women who took the drugs had a slightly higher risk of less serious heart problems, such as an abnormal heart beat or swelling and irritation of the membrane surrounding the...

  • Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study

    Posted: 04/28/2016

    Breast Cancer Gene Might Lower Women's Fertility: Study WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A gene mutation that is linked to a greater risk of breast cancer may also be tied to potential fertility problems, researchers report. The BRCA1 gene mutation, which raises the risk of breast cancer by 80 percent, may be linked to having fewer eggs in the ovaries as a woman ages, the Australian investigators said. But a cause-and-effect relationship was not proven. "Although BRCA1 is thought of as a ca...

  • Botox Can Be Used for Chronic Migraine, Experts Say

    Posted: 04/25/2016

    Botox Can Be Used for Chronic Migraine, Experts Say MONDAY, April 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Botox is a safe and effective treatment for chronic migraine and three other neurological disorders, an updated guideline from the American Academy of Neurology says. Long used to smooth wrinkles, botulinum toxin is made by a type of bacteria. The toxin blocks the release of substances at nerve endings, reducing muscle contraction and the transmission of pain signals, the researchers explained. The authors of ...

  • Besides Your Lungs, Smoking May Harm Your Job Prospects, Paycheck

    Posted: 04/19/2016

    Besides Your Lungs, Smoking May Harm Your Job Prospects, Paycheck MONDAY, April 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The "Mad Men" glory days of smoking at work are long gone. Today, smokers have a harder time finding jobs, and earn less than nonsmokers when they do get work, a new study suggests. "When we studied a sample of 251 [unemployed] job seekers over a 12-month period, smokers relative to nonsmokers were at a serious disadvantage for finding re-employment," said study lead author Judith Prochaska. "Whe...