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  • Regular Phys Ed Builds More Than Fitness

    Posted: 04/24/2017

    Regular Phys Ed Builds More Than Fitness MONDAY, April 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Rules requiring regular physical education for young teens stem from "good science," researchers say. Frequent "phys ed" classes not only improve fitness, they also encourage healthy living, finds a study from Oregon State University. Researchers looked at more than 400 students, ages 12 to 15. They found that more than one in five received no physical education, and only about 27 percent met federal government physical ...

  • Race May Play Role in Obese Teens' Blood Pressure

    Posted: 04/17/2017

    Race May Play Role in Obese Teens' Blood Pressure MONDAY, April 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Obese teenagers are at increased risk of high blood pressure, but the effects of those extra pounds may vary by race and ethnicity, a new study suggests. Researchers found that obesity had a bigger impact on blood pressure of Hispanic and white teens, compared to their black and Asian peers. It appeared to raise their risk of high blood pressure by four to six times. Pediatric experts said the impact on Hispanic...

  • Rehab Services Lacking in States Hit Hard by Opioids

    Posted: 04/16/2017

    Rehab Services Lacking in States Hit Hard by Opioids FRIDAY, April 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Opioid treatment programs for low-income Americans are in short supply in areas where they're needed the most, a new study contends. Lack of affordable access is particularly apparent across the Southeast, researchers said. The finding follows the Trump Administration's announcement last week that it would be establishing a new commission to focus on the nation's growing opioid epidemic. Opioid medications inc...

  • Race Plays Role in Heart, Diabetes Risk, Even at Normal Weight

    Posted: 04/10/2017

    Race Plays Role in Heart, Diabetes Risk, Even at Normal Weight MONDAY, April 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Americans of South Asian and Hispanic descent who aren't overweight may be more at risk for heart disease, stroke and diabetes than normal-weight white people are, a new study finds. "Clinicians using overweight/obesity as the main criteria for [heart disease and diabetes] screening, as currently recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, may fail to identify [heart disease and diabetes]...

  • Researchers Take Aim at Insecticide-Resistant Bedbugs

    Posted: 04/10/2017

    Researchers Take Aim at Insecticide-Resistant Bedbugs FRIDAY, March 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's a potential new weapon in the fight against the scourge of travelers everywhere -- bedbugs. Researchers from North Carolina State University and Penn State say they have created a fungal "biopesticide" to battle even the strongest bedbugs. "Bedbugs were all but eradicated from the United States and other industrialized nations after World War II, likely due to the use of DDT and other broad-spectrum ...

  • Ready for Spring Allergies?

    Posted: 04/06/2017

    Ready for Spring Allergies? THURSDAY, March 30, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Spring routinely spells misery for allergy sufferers, but a recent survey reveals that most patients don't try to manage their symptoms until it's too late. The survey asked more than 1,000 adults with seasonal allergies and more than 500 parents of children with seasonal allergies how they prepared for the high pollen counts that come with warmer weather. The survey found that three out of four only thought about managing symptoms...

  • Raccoon Parasite Not as Deadly to Humans as Thought

    Posted: 04/03/2017

    Raccoon Parasite Not as Deadly to Humans as Thought FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A raccoon parasite that can be deadly in humans can infect people without causing symptoms, a new study indicates. It was believed that the parasite Baylisascaris procyonis , or raccoon roundworm, led to severe neurological problems and even death in infected people. But University of Georgia (UGA) researchers found that isn't necessarily true. They looked at 347 wildlife rehabilitation workers -- who are at h...

  • Remote Amazon Tribe May Have Healthiest Hearts on Earth

    Posted: 03/27/2017

    Remote Amazon Tribe May Have Healthiest Hearts on Earth FRIDAY, March 17, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A primitive Amazonian tribe appears to have the best heart health in the world, living a simple existence that inadvertently provides them extraordinary protection against heart disease, researchers report. The Tsimane people of Bolivia lead an active life of subsistence farming and foraging for food in the Amazon rainforest, said study author Dr. Gregory Thomas. He is medical director of the Memorial Care...

  • Refugees Deserve Health Care, Compassion, U.S. Pediatricians Say

    Posted: 03/21/2017

    Refugees Deserve Health Care, Compassion, U.S. Pediatricians Say MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. government should treat immigrant and refugee children with compassion and provide them with appropriate health care, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says in a new policy statement. "Many of the immigrant children arriving to this country from our southern border are victims of unspeakable violence, persecution and abject poverty," AAP President Dr. Fernando Stein said in a news ...

  • Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug May Not Ease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome After All

    Posted: 03/14/2017

    Rheumatoid Arthritis Drug May Not Ease Chronic Fatigue Syndrome After All MONDAY, March 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A small-scale clinical trial has cast doubt upon the potential usefulness of an anti-inflammatory drug to treat chronic fatigue syndrome. Doctors had hoped that anakinra (Kineret) -- a medication for rheumatoid arthritis -- also could be used to relieve symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome. But after a month of daily anakinra injections, a group of 25 women reported chronic fatigue symptom...