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  • Report Faulty Tobacco Products to FDA

    Posted: 06/26/2016

    Report Faulty Tobacco Products to FDA SUNDAY, June 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If your water pipe, e-cigarette, hookah or smokeless tobacco is defective or causing a health problem, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to hear from you. To report problems related to these or any other tobacco products, you can use the agency's online Safety Reporting Portal (see below). "There is no known safe tobacco product, but FDA can play a role in helping prevent certain unexpected health consequences," sa...

  • Report Hints Zika Can Spread Through Oral Sex

    Posted: 06/13/2016

    Report Hints Zika Can Spread Through Oral Sex FRIDAY, June 3, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new report from France suggests that the Zika virus can be transmitted through oral sex. Zika is typically spread through the bite of the Aedes Aegypti mosquito, but the new case adds to building evidence that the virus may be transmitted through sexual contact more readily than thought. Zika symptoms are typically mild in most people. However, the virus can cause a catastrophic birth defect known as microcephaly in...

  • Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries

    Posted: 06/09/2016

    Refugees Aren't Getting Needed Surgeries THURSDAY, June 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of refugees aren't getting the surgery they need, researchers report. "When planning to take care of refugees, much thought is put into how to house and feed and clothe people who are far from home for circumstances often beyond their control. But surgery is a basic need and nobody talks about this," said Dr. Adam Kushner, leader of a new study conducted at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in ...

  • Researchers Uncover Surprises About Celiac Disease

    Posted: 06/08/2016

    Researchers Uncover Surprises About Celiac Disease TUESDAY, May 31, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New research has revealed some surprising findings about who develops celiac disease in the United States. The study found that it's most common among people whose ancestors came from India's Punjab region. Previously, experts thought celiac mostly affected white people with European ancestry. Celiac also seems to affect men and women equally, regardless of ethnicity, the researchers said. "It is now recognized ...

  • Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

    Posted: 06/02/2016

    Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after diagnosis with a common type of brain cancer. If confirmed in other studies, the researchers say their findings could lead to improved treatment in the future. The type of brain cancer in the study is glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing tumor. People with this type of cancer survive an average of less than two years...

  • Rural Hospitals Often Safer, Cheaper for Common Surgeries: Study

    Posted: 05/24/2016

    Rural Hospitals Often Safer, Cheaper for Common Surgeries: Study TUESDAY, May 17, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having a commonplace surgery -- such as a gallbladder removal -- may be safer when done in a rural hospital compared to a suburban or city hospital, a new study finds. "This study gives credence to what rural surgeons long suspected -- that well-done rural surgery is safe and cost-effective," study author Dr. Tyler Hughes said in a University of Michigan news release. Hughes is one of only two surg...

  • Restrictive Diets May Cause Thyroid Troubles in Young Kids

    Posted: 05/17/2016

    Restrictive Diets May Cause Thyroid Troubles in Young Kids TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Two cases of children who developed iodine deficiency highlight the risks of putting too many restrictions on young kids' diets, researchers say. The doctors said that the children -- aged 2 and 5 -- developed iodine deficiency because their diets lacked salt, dairy products, bread and other sources of the mineral. Iodine deficiency is common in developing countries, but was virtually eliminated in the U...

  • Race May Influence Risk for Irregular Heart Beat

    Posted: 05/13/2016

    Race May Influence Risk for Irregular Heart Beat THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's a strong link between the heart rhythm disorder atrial fibrillation and race, a new study says. Whites with heart failure are much more likely to have atrial fibrillation (AF) than blacks or Hispanics with heart failure, the study authors said. Heart failure is a common risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Heart failure affects 5.8 million people in the United States and more than 23 million worldwide, the...

  • Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation

    Posted: 05/12/2016

    Restoring Blood Flow Beats Exercise for Poor Leg Circulation THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For people with poor circulation in their leg arteries, a medical procedure to restore blood flow may have greater benefits than exercise, preliminary research suggests. People with peripheral artery disease (PAD) experience pain and fatigue while walking. These symptoms develop because poor circulation in the arteries that supply blood to the limbs causes damage and scarring in the muscles, the resear...

  • Robots Stake Their Claim in the Operating Room

    Posted: 05/11/2016

    Robots Stake Their Claim in the Operating Room WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A surgical robot outperformed human surgeons in stitching the small intestines of pigs back together, researchers report. Without any direct human interaction, the Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (STAR) reconnected the intestines with sutures that proved more accurate, evenly spaced and durable than those created by human hands, the machine's developers said. The test shows it's possible to create a smart robot that ...