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  • The 'Love Hormone' May Quiet Tinnitus

    Posted: 09/29/2016

    The 'Love Hormone' May Quiet Tinnitus THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People suffering from chronic ringing in the ears -- called tinnitus -- may find some relief by spraying the hormone oxytocin in their nose, a small initial study by Brazilian researchers suggests. Oxytocin -- dubbed the "love hormone" because it promotes social connections -- might also help relieve the annoying and sometimes disturbing noises of tinnitus. "Oxytocin has actions in the brain and the ear that may help in t...

  • Tamoxifen OK for Breast Cancer Patients Without Uterine Abnormalities: Study

    Posted: 09/29/2016

    Tamoxifen OK for Breast Cancer Patients Without Uterine Abnormalities: Study THURSDAY, Sept. 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For most women, taking the breast cancer drug tamoxifen doesn't increase their risk of uterine cancer, a new study suggests. For women who don't already have precancerous abnormalities in the uterine lining (endometrium), the risk is small, according to the Loyola Medicine study. The researchers said a pretreatment ultrasound may ease women's concerns. "Many women who would benefit f...

  • Tips for Avoiding Back-to-School Germs, Illnesses

    Posted: 09/29/2016

    Tips for Avoiding Back-to-School Germs, Illnesses FRIDAY, Sept. 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Kids and germs seem to go together like peanut butter and jelly. But, there are ways that parents can help protect their kids from the usual barrage of back-to-school illnesses, a health expert says. Make sure children get plenty of sleep and eat a well balanced diet, advises Jacqueline Stout-Aguilar. She's a registered nurse and an assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Nursing. Most kids need at l...

  • The Phenomenon of Sleep Paralysis

    Posted: 09/29/2016

    The Phenomenon of Sleep Paralysis MONDAY, Sept. 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine you wake up, see a stranger running toward you with a knife and your legs won't move so there's no escape. Terrifying episodes like these are known as sleep paralysis. They're not dangerous, it's just your brain telling your body it's still in dreamland, according to Texas A&M University researchers. When you're in the stage of sleep where vivid dreams occur (known as REM sleep), your arms and legs are temporarily p...

  • To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut'

    Posted: 09/29/2016

    To Help Prevent Colon Cancer, 'Listen to Your Gut' TUESDAY, Sept. 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Sometimes following up on a gut feeling can make the difference between life and death, especially for people with colon cancer, researchers report. People who pay attention to their digestive system are more likely to notice worrisome symptoms and seek medical attention sooner, said Dr. Amit Singal and colleagues at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. And when colon cancer is caught...

  • Think Telecommuting's the Way to Go? Maybe Not for the Boss

    Posted: 09/27/2016

    Think Telecommuting's the Way to Go? Maybe Not for the Boss TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Telecommuting may hamper a supervisor's ability to lead co-workers, a new study suggests. Experiments with 84 four-person teams of college students revealed that "people are biased toward the people they are physically located with," study co-author Cody Reeves said in a Brigham Young University news release. "People who are working remotely on a team can be at a disadvantage when it comes to being se...

  • Tourette Threat Surges for Babies When Mom Smokes in Pregnancy

    Posted: 09/25/2016

    Tourette Threat Surges for Babies When Mom Smokes in Pregnancy FRIDAY, Sept. 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Children born to mothers who smoked during pregnancy are at increased risk for Tourette syndrome and other chronic tics, a new study suggests. Tics are repeated twitches, movements or sounds that people are unable to control. For the study, researchers analyzed data from more than 73,000 births in Denmark. The investigators found that children whose mothers smoked 10 or more cigarettes a day during ...

  • Tighter Blood Pressure Control Could Save 100,000 U.S. Lives: Study

    Posted: 09/22/2016

    Tighter Blood Pressure Control Could Save 100,000 U.S. Lives: Study THURSDAY, Sept. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Engaging Americans at high risk for heart disease in aggressive efforts to lower their blood pressure could save more than 100,000 lives a year, a new analysis indicates. Current guidelines recommend a systolic pressure -- the top number in a blood pressure reading -- of below 140 mm Hg. But a 2015 study from the U.S. National Institutes of Health suggested more lives could be saved if the go...

  • The Football Injuries Most Likely to End an NFL Career

    Posted: 09/15/2016

    The Football Injuries Most Likely to End an NFL Career THURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- When the NFL season kicks off Thursday night with a rematch between last year's Super Bowl teams, the Carolina Panthers and the Denver Broncos, football fans will be focusing on which franchise claims victory this time around. But fears of career-ending injuries lurk in the back of the minds of professional football players every time they take the field, and a new study sheds some light on exactly what ki...

  • TV Booze Ads a Lubricant for Teen Drinking: Study

    Posted: 09/14/2016

    TV Booze Ads a Lubricant for Teen Drinking: Study WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The more ads for a brand of alcohol that underage drinkers see, the more likely they are to consume that product, a new study finds. The findings add to evidence linking alcohol ads to underage drinking. And they also suggest that alcohol ads on TV influence how much booze underage drinkers consume, said lead researcher Dr. Timothy Naimi. He's an associate professor of community health sciences at Boston Unive...