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  • Weight at First Pregnancy Linked to Complications Next Time

    Posted: 08/05/2015

    Weight at First Pregnancy Linked to Complications Next Time TUESDAY, July 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with an unhealthy weight in a first pregnancy could be at greater risk for complications in their next pregnancy -- even if they're at a good weight, a new study finds. Most American women are not at a healthy weight when they first become pregnant, meaning their body mass index (BMI) is higher or lower than ideal, researchers say. It is more common for them to have a high BMI than a low one. BMI...

  • Well-Off, Active, Over 50? You May Be at Higher Risk for Problem Drinking

    Posted: 07/30/2015

    Well-Off, Active, Over 50? You May Be at Higher Risk for Problem Drinking THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Are you over 50, making a good income, physically healthy and active? A new British study suggests you might need to be wary of one potential downside: a higher risk for excessive, problem drinking. A team led by Jose Iparraguirre, chief economist at the British charity Age UK, found that so-called "successful agers" are at heightened risk for harmful drinking. It's a "middle-class pheno...

  • Women Descend Into Alzheimer's at Twice the Speed of Men: Study

    Posted: 07/29/2015

    Women Descend Into Alzheimer's at Twice the Speed of Men: Study TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with mild thinking and memory problems -- known as mild cognitive impairment -- deteriorate twice as fast mentally as men with the same condition, according to new research. Mild cognitive impairment isn't severe enough to interfere with daily life, but it is linked to higher odds of developing Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia, the researchers said. "Our findings do suggest gre...

  • When Bystanders Give CPR Right Away, Lives Are Saved, Study Shows

    Posted: 07/29/2015

    When Bystanders Give CPR Right Away, Lives Are Saved, Study Shows TUESDAY, July 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many lives could be saved if more people performed CPR immediately after seeing someone go into cardiac arrest, a new study contends. To come to that conclusion, the researchers looked at the results of a four-year program in North Carolina that promoted bystander CPR. "During that time, survival with good brain function increased from 7 to 10 percent for those who received bystander CPR," said l...

  • Will Good Students Be Able to Sidestep Alzheimer's?

    Posted: 07/27/2015

    Will Good Students Be Able to Sidestep Alzheimer's? MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Kids at the head of the class not only have better college and job prospects, they may also stave off Alzheimer's disease, two new studies suggest. People with the best school grades and most complex jobs later on -- as managers, teachers or executives, for example -- have roughly a 40 to 60 percent reduced risk of developing dementia, according to two teams of Swedish researchers. But, both Swedish studies onl...

  • Why Skin Wrinkles More Around the Eyes

    Posted: 07/27/2015

    Why Skin Wrinkles More Around the Eyes FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Facial wrinkles -- such as so-called "laugh lines" or "crow's feet" -- are the bane of many aging adults. Now, new research on cadavers may offer some insight into why some skin creases are more pronounced than others. Differences in oil-secreting glands just below the skin may help explain why forehead wrinkles are shallower than wrinkles around the outer eye, according to a research team led by Yuichi Tamatsu, of Kagoshim...

  • Wars in Iraq, Afghanistan Left Hundreds of Children With Head Trauma

    Posted: 07/26/2015

    Wars in Iraq, Afghanistan Left Hundreds of Children With Head Trauma FRIDAY, July 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- At least 650 children sustained severe head injuries during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, according to a new study. About one-quarter of those children died from their head injuries, the research revealed. Using the Joint Theater Trauma Registry, researchers identified children with severe head injuries who were treated at U.S. combat support hospitals in Iraq or Afghanistan between 2004 an...

  • Wildfires May Spark Heart Hazards for Miles Around

    Posted: 07/22/2015

    Wildfires May Spark Heart Hazards for Miles Around WEDNESDAY, July 15, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Wildfires create air pollution that fuels the risk for heart hazards, including heart attacks, especially in older adults, researchers report. Wildfires that raged in Victoria, Australia, for two months several years ago were associated with a 7 percent increase in sudden cardiac arrests -- an electrical malfunction that causes the heart to stop beating. Hospitalizations for heart disease rose nearly 2 percen...

  • Wider Use of Statin Drugs Could Save Thousands More Lives: Report

    Posted: 07/22/2015

    Wider Use of Statin Drugs Could Save Thousands More Lives: Report TUESDAY, July 14, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New expert guidelines from two major cardiologists' groups may boost doctors' ability to spot patients who should take cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, researchers said. The updated guidelines were released in 2013 by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. Now, a new report finds they are more accurate and efficient than earlier guidelines in identifying adults a...

  • What's In a Name? For Newborns, Maybe Fewer Medical Errors

    Posted: 07/21/2015

    What's In a Name? For Newborns, Maybe Fewer Medical Errors MONDAY, July 13, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Using more specific names for newborns may reduce hospital mix-ups by roughly a third, a new study suggests. Hospitals usually identify newborns by generic names such as "Babygirl Jackson" or "Brendasboy Jones" instead of the names parents give them. The reason: A patient record and name tag must be created immediately after birth, and changing records during a single hospital stay can cause confusion, s...