RWJ Health Connect | Patient PortalGo
  • 1-888-MD-RWJUH
  • YouTube

Smoking Cessation

  • Search by Keywords

Today in Health News

E-Cigs May Damage Cells in Mouth
Findings suggest a possible increase in the risk of oral disease, researchers say
Getting Started
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Enter a search phrase:

Smoking Cessation

Nicotine Quiz
Take the Nicotine Quiz Nicotine, one of the main chemicals in tobacco, is the primary reason that smoking is so addictive, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Even though most smokers know that smoking is bad for them, they find it difficult to quit because of nicotine's effect. 1. Nicotine causes which of these changes in the body? You didn't answer this question. You answered The correct answer is Nicotine temporarily increases the heart rate by two to three beats a minute and in...
Quitting Smoking Quiz
What Do You Know About Quitting Smoking? No matter what your age or how long you have smoked, giving up cigarettes is the ticket to a longer life. Consider that just 12 hours after your last cigarette, the carbon monoxide level in your blood returns to normal. A year after you've quit, your risk of heart disease is half that of a smoker's. 1. The risk for death by heart attack or coronary heart disease decreases by 50 percent how soon after you quit smoking? You didn't answer this question. You answered...
Smoking and Pregnancy Quiz
What Do You Know About Smoking During Pregnancy? This quiz will help you learn how smoking affects your baby. 1. Most babies of women who smoke weigh the same as babies of women who don't smoke. You didn't answer this question. You answered The correct answer is They weigh an average of a half-pound less and are more likely to be born early and need special care after birth, according to the CDC. Smoking nearly doubles a woman's risk of having a baby with low birth weight (less than 5.5 pounds). The ave...
Here Are the Tools to Help You Stop Now
Coronary Artery Disease Assessment
Coronary Artery Disease Risk Assessment Coronary artery disease (CAD) occurs when the coronary arteries, or the arteries that bring blood to the heart muscle, become hardened and narrowed. The arteries harden and narrow because of a buildup of plaque on their inner walls. This is called atherosclerosis. Significant narrowing of the coronary arteries can reduce blood to flow to the heart. This limits the amount of oxygen the heart receives and can lead to angina, heart failure, irregular heart rhythm, an...
More Resources