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Exercise

Target Heart Rate Calculator
Target Heart Rate Calculator Your target heart rate is the range at which sustained physical activity—running, cycling, swimming laps, or any other aerobic exercise—is considered safe and effective. It is a percentage of what your maximum heart rate should be. The more fit you are, the higher the percentage can go. This calculator uses the age-based method to determine your target heart rate. Enter Your Information Age: years Fitness Level: Out of Shape Fit Athletic Your Results Based on your fitness le...
Calorie Burn Rate Calculator
Calorie Burn Rate Calculator The more active you are, the more calories you burn. Running or jogging, for instance, burns more calories than bowling. Carrying your clubs when golfing burns more calories than riding in a golf cart. Your weight also affects the number of calories burned: The more you weigh, the more calories you burn. Fill in your weight, and the calculator will provide you with a list of activities and an approximation of how many calories you will burn. If you haven't been active or you...
Printable Training Log
Some people like to train intensely for peak performance. Others enjoy getting out and doing what they can. Either way, a training log can help you get more from your workout by helping you track your progress
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Exercise

Weight-Training Safety Quiz
Take the Weight-Training Safety Quiz Many Americans are starting weight-training (or resistance-training) programs to improve their health and fitness. The following quiz can help you determine if you know enough about strength training to start a program yourself. 1. Weight training increases fitness by increasing muscle strength and endurance, enhancing the cardiovascular system, and increasing flexibility. You didn't answer this question. You answered The correct answer is It's important to maintain ...
Fast Facts
Work out while watching your favorite TV show or listening to an audio book. Set up the TV near your treadmill or stationary bike. Newer exercise equipment comes with an mp3 port for music.
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The No-Excuse 30-Minute Workout
The No-Excuse 30-Minute Workout Exercise is one of the best ways to prevent type 2 diabetes in people with metabolic syndrome. Exercise also helps to lower the risk for heart disease. It helps to improve blood pressure, triglycerides, blood glucose, and weight. Get the benefits! Try this 30-minute workout you can do anywhere. Warm-up—5 minutes Slowly walk, bicycle, or go up and down the stairs. Aerobic exercise—10 minutes Choose an activity you enjoy—anything that raises your heart rate and makes you br...
Walking Works for Everyone
Walking Works for Everyone Fit people may think walking is "too easy" to keep them fit. Overweight people may wonder if they really can become trim by walking. Older people and those with medical conditions such as osteoporosis or heart disease may wonder if walking is safe. In fact, walking works for people of all ages, fitness levels, weights, and health conditions. Appreciate the benefits Walking is easy because you can do it almost anywhere and at any time. It also offers a range of health benefits....
Exercise Goals for Healthy Living
Exercise Goals for Healthy Living Making exercise part of your daily life isn't hard if you make it a priority. To do that, you need to develop goals and an exercise plan that matches your needs and interests. These steps can help you define your personal goals and put them into action. Be sure to check with your health care provider before beginning an exercise program. First step Determine what you want to achieve through exercise. Do you need to lose weight? Help maintain a healthy weight? Reduce you...
How and Why to Keep a Training Log
How and Why to Keep a Training Log A training log can help you get more from your workout. It will help you organize and save information about your exercise routine so you can work toward a specific goal. For example, if you're training for a marathon, keeping a log can help you track how you run under various weather conditions or when you're following a special diet. You can record information about the prettiest routes if you're walking to enjoy the scenery. Your log also can prod you to work out on...
Designing an Exercise Program
Designing an Exercise Program How to design an exercise program Exercise is essential to maintaining health and can also improve your overall sense of well-being. Even low-to-moderate intensity activities for as little as 30 minutes a day can be beneficial. These activities may include: Pleasure walking Climbing stairs Gardening Yard work Moderate-to-heavy housework Dancing Home exercise However, more vigorous aerobic activities, done three or four times a week for 30 to 60 minutes, are best for improvi...
Exercise: Before Starting an Exercise Program
Exercise: Before Starting an Exercise Program Starting a daily exercise program It is always important to consult your physician before starting an exercise program. This is particularly true if any of the following apply to your current health status: Chest pain or pain in the neck and/or arm Shortness of breath A diagnosed heart condition Joint and/or bone problems Currently taking cardiac and/or blood pressure medications Have not previously been physically active Dizziness Obesity When beginning an ...
Risks of Physical Inactivity
Risks of Physical Inactivity What health risks are associated with physical inactivity? Lack of physical activity has clearly been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and other conditions. Less active, less fit persons have a greater risk of developing high blood pressure. Studies indicate that physically active people are less likely to develop coronary heart disease than those who are inactive--even after the researchers accounted for smoking, alcohol use, and diet. Lack of physical a...
Move to the Music: Dancing as Exercise
Move to the Music: Dancing as Exercise Don’t like jogging in the park or swatting a tennis ball on the court? Slip on your dancing shoes instead for a good workout. The benefits of dancing go well beyond heart health and physical fitness. Dancing, especially group dance activities, provides opportunities for people of all ages to be socially and mentally engaged, as well. Many people find the combination of music and movement stimulating, relaxing, and pleasurable. Research shows that dancing can have a...