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Surgical Care

After Surgery: Discomforts and Complications
After Surgery: Discomforts and Complications What are some common postoperative discomforts? The amount of discomfort following surgery depends on many things, including the type of surgery performed. Typical discomforts may include: Nausea and vomiting from general anesthesia Sore throat (caused by the tube placed in the windpipe for breathing during surgery) Soreness, pain, and swelling around the incision site Restlessness and sleeplessness Thirst Constipation and gas (flatulence) What complications ...
Checklist for Surgery/Consent Forms/Insurance Information
Checklist for Surgery/Consent Forms/Insurance Information Checklist for surgery The decision to have surgery is a very important one. You will need to be fully informed and prepared for the surgery, as well as for any special needs that you may have following the surgery. Your preparation will affect the outcome and the results. The following is a checklist to assist you in your preparation for surgery: Make a list of questions to ask your doctor or surgeon regarding the type of surgery recommended. Det...
Common Surgical Procedures
Common Surgical Procedures Some of the most common surgical operations done in the United States include the following: Appendectomy. An appendectomy is the surgical removal of the appendix, a small tube that branches off the large intestine, to treat acute appendicitis. Appendicitis is the acute inflammation of this tube due to infection. Breast biopsy. A biopsy is a diagnostic test involving the removal of tissue or cells for examination under a microscope. This procedure is also used to remove abnorm...
Discharge Planning
Discharge Planning Discharge planning after surgery Once you meet the discharge criteria specified for your type of surgery, you will be released to go home or be transferred from the recovery room to a hospital room. Hospitals usually require that you have a responsible friend or family member to drive you home, as coordination and reflexes may be impaired for 24 hours following anesthesia. Your discharge plan may include instructions on how to take care of the wound dressings, what medications to take...
Home Page - Surgical Care
Topic Index Surgery Overview Questions To Ask Before Surgery Preoperative Management Intraoperative Care Postoperative Management Surgery is the treatment of disease, injury, or other disorders by direct physical intervention, usually with instruments. Surgery involves cutting into the skin or other organs to help restore the body to a healthy state. This may include further exploring the condition to make a diagnosis, taking a biopsy of a suspicious lump, or removing diseased tissues or organs. In addi...
How Wounds Heal
How Wounds Heal Most of us take wound healing for granted. If you get a small cut, you may clean and cover it with a bandage, and move on with your life. Yet under that bandage (or in the open air), the body orchestrates a complex cascade of events designed to heal wounds big and small. The basic steps of wound healing are: Stopping the bleeding (hemostasis). When your skin is cut, scraped, or punctured, you usually begin to bleed. Within minutes or even seconds, unless you have a bleeding disorder, blo...
Intra-Abdominal Abscess
Intra-Abdominal Abscess What is an intra-abdominal abscess? An intra-abdominal abscess is a collection of pus or infected fluid that is surrounded by inflamed tissue inside the abdomen. It can involve any abdominal organ, or it can settle in the folds of the bowel. What causes an intra-abdominal abscess? Intra-abdominal abscesses sometimes happen because of another condition. An example might be appendicitis or diverticulitis. Many cases, however, happen after surgery. Abdominal abscesses can be caused ...
Intraoperative Care
Intraoperative Care During your procedure, special care is taken by all members of the surgical team to ensure that no complications arise. Below are some of the considerations that need to be made immediately prior to or during your procedure. The Day of Surgery / Getting Ready For Surgery / The Operating Room Methods of Surgery Other Techniques of Surgery Common Surgical Procedures Outpatient Surgery
Methods of Surgery
Methods of Surgery What are the different methods of surgery? With technical advances today, surgery does not necessarily mean large incisions and longer healing times, as in the past. Depending on the type of surgery, there are several surgery methods that may be done: Open surgery An "open" surgery means the cutting of skin and tissues so that the surgeon has a full view of the structures or organs involved. Minimally invasive surgery Minimally invasive surgery is any technique involved in surgery tha...
Online Resources - Surgical Care
Online Resources - Surgical Care This Web was compiled from a variety of sources including the online resources listed below, but is not intended to substitute or replace the professional medical advice you receive from your health care provider. The content provided here is for informational purposes only, and was not designed to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. Please consult your health care provider with any questions or concerns you may have regarding your condition. This page contain...
Other Techniques of Surgery
Other Techniques of Surgery Other techniques of surgery: In addition to using traditional instruments such as surgical knives in surgery, both open and minimally invasive surgery can use the following alternative techniques, depending on diagnosis: Laser surgery A laser is a device that emits a concentrated beam of light radiation. A laser beam can cauterize a wound, repair damaged tissue, or destroy cells under the beam, allowing for cutting through tissue without damaging neighboring cells. Laser has ...
Outpatient Surgery
Outpatient Surgery What is outpatient surgery? With improved technology and advances in anesthesia and pain control, many less invasive surgical procedures are now being performed on an outpatient, or ambulatory, basis. Common procedures that are now routinely performed on an outpatient basis include tonsillectomies, hernia repairs, gallbladder removals, some cosmetic surgeries, and cataract surgeries. Given the millions of procedures performed every year, complications from outpatient procedures are re...
Pain Management
Pain Management Pain control after surgery Pain is your body's way of telling you something is wrong. It is typical to expect a certain amount of pain following surgery; however, if pain does not subside with pain medication, there may be a more serious problem. Your doctors and nurses will ask about your pain because they want you to be comfortable. It is important that they be alerted if their efforts to control your pain are not effective. With today's new and improved pain medications, there is no r...
Postoperative Management
Postoperative Management Recovering From Surgery / Intensive Care After Surgery: Discomforts and Complications Pain Management Discharge Planning
Preoperative Management
Preoperative Management Before any type of surgical procedure, it is important to become prepared. Listed below are considerations that should be made before any elective (nonemergency) procedure. Preparing for Surgery Tests Performed Before Surgery The Surgical Team Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist Checklist for Surgery / Consent Forms / Insurance Information
Preparing for Surgery
Preparing for Surgery As with any type of surgery, there are certain preparations that need to take place. Determining what preparations are necessary will depend on what type of surgery you have and the type of anesthesia that will be given. The following are considerations for you to discuss with your doctor or surgeon before your procedure: Ask the surgeon to explain the benefits, risks, and expectations of the procedure. Discuss what type of anesthesia will be given and what recovery time is expecte...
Preparing For Surgery: The Operating Room
Preparing For Surgery: The Operating Room What to expect the day of surgery On the day of surgery, you will meet with the medical team involved in your surgery. This may include your surgeon, the anesthesiologist, and various other health care professionals. Getting ready for surgery You may expect some of the following to occur: You may need to change into a hospital gown. You will receive an identification bracelet. An intravenous catheter (IV) may be inserted in your forearm or other location for ane...
Purpose of Having Surgery
Purpose of Having Surgery What is the purpose of surgery? Surgery, whether elective or urgent, is done for a multitude of reasons. A patient may have surgery to: Further explore the condition for the purpose of diagnosis Take a biopsy of a suspicious lump Remove or repair diseased tissues or organs Remove an obstruction Reposition structures to their normal position Redirect blood vessels (bypass surgery) Transplant tissue or whole organs Implant mechanical or electronic devices Improve physical appeara...
Questions to Ask Before Surgery
Questions to Ask Before Surgery Important questions to ask before having surgery Millions of Americans will undergo surgery each year. It is important to be informed about the surgery being recommended, particularly if it is elective surgery (an operation you choose to have done), rather than an emergency surgery (also called urgent surgery). All surgeries have risks and benefits. It's important to understand them before deciding whether the procedure is appropriate for you. The following are important ...
Recovering From Surgery/Intensive Care
Recovering From Surgery/Intensive Care Recovering from surgery Once surgery has been completed, you are brought to the recovery room, which also may be called the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). In the recovery room, clinical staff will closely monitor you as you recover from anesthesia. The length of time spent in recovery depends on the type of surgery performed and the condition of the individual patient. While a patient is in recovery, the clinical staff may do the following: Monitor vital signs s...
Surgery Overview
Surgery Overview Types of Surgery The Surgical Setting Purpose of Having Surgery
Surgery Statistics
Surgery Statistics According to the latest data from the National Center for Health Statistics, 45 million inpatient surgical procedures were performed in the United States in 2007, followed closely by outpatient surgeries. Other surgical statistics for both in- and outpatient procedures include: Hysterectomy: 517,000 Cesarean section: 1.3 million Reduction of fracture: 677,000 Coronary artery bypass graft: 405,000 Total knee replacement: 543,000 Total hip replacement: 230,000
Surgical Setting
The Surgical Setting What will the surgical setting look like? In the past, surgery may have meant a lengthy hospital stay to recover. With modern medical advances, people now have several options, depending on the diagnosis and type of surgery required: Inpatient surgery. Some of the more intensive surgeries still require you to stay overnight or longer in a hospital setting. This allows clinical staff to monitor your recovery and ensures immediate medical attention in case of complications. Outpatient...
Surgical Site Infections
Surgical Site Infections Your skin is a natural barrier against infection. Even with many precautions and protocols to prevent infection in place, any surgery that causes a break in the skin can lead to an infection. Doctors call these infections surgical site infections (SSIs) because they occur on the part of the body where the surgery took place. If you have surgery, the chances of developing an SSI are about 1% to 3%. Types of surgical site infections An SSI typically occurs within 30 days after sur...
Surgical Team
The Surgical Team When a patient undergoes surgery, a team of medical staff assists the surgeon in the procedure. The number of team members differs depending on the type of surgery done. Among others, most teams include: The surgeon A surgeon has completed four years of medical school and has received four or more years of further specialized training after medical school. Most surgeons have passed exams given by a national board of surgeons for "board certification." The American Board of Surgery is t...
Tests Performed Before Surgery
Tests Performed Before Surgery Many surgeons order routine laboratory tests before admission to the hospital, or even before certain outpatient procedures, to identify potential problems that might complicate surgery if not detected and treated early. Some of the most common tests performed before surgery (and possible reasons or symptoms for which they are performed) are included in the following list: Chest X-rays. A diagnostic test that uses invisible electromagnetic energy beams to produce images of...
Topic Index - Surgical Care
Topic Index - Surgical Care Surgery Home Surgery Overview Types of Surgery The Surgical Setting Purpose of Having Surgery Questions To Ask Before Surgery Preoperative Management Preparing for Surgery Tests Performed Before Surgery The Surgical Team Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist Checklist for Surgery / Consent Forms / Insurance Information Intraoperative Care The Day of Surgery / Getting Ready For Surgery / The Operating Room Methods of Surgery Other Techniques of Surgery Common Surgical ...
Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist
Types of Anesthesia and Your Anesthesiologist Types of anesthesia During surgery, you will be given some form of anesthesia, which is medication administered for the relief of pain and sensation during surgery. The type and dosage of anesthesia is administered by the anesthesiologist. When a patient faces surgery, he or she will meet with the anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist before the procedure. The anesthesiologist will review the patient's medical condition and history to plan the appropriate an...
Types of Surgery
Types of Surgery What is surgical diagnosis? As part of your diagnosis, you and your doctor may discuss surgery as a way to correct your condition. This decision is based on careful evaluation of your personal medical history and subsequent medical tests, such as blood tests, X-rays, MRI, CT scan, electrocardiogram, or other laboratory work performed to determine the exact diagnosis. What are the different types of surgery? Depending on the diagnosis, a patient has several surgery options: Elective surg...